We Can't Do It Alone , We Need Your Support

We Can't Do It Alone , We Need Your Support
To Provide awareness regarding Girl Child Education , Menstrual Hygiene ,Girls Toilet , Sanitation and Safe Drinking Water , to thousands of families to make there lives Healthy and Happier !!! Please Support Our Fundraising Campaign To Reach Out To 25,000 Targeted Families In 5 States of India PLEASE MAKE THIS PICTURE YOUR COVER PAGE JUST FOR A DAY AT LEAST ! DONATE & SHARE

Monday, 29 April 2019

How Can We Bring Menstrual Hygiene Equality?

Menstrual hygiene in India is one of the major matter of debate. Furthermore, a large amount of research has shown that lack of hygiene and infrastructure lead girls to drop out schools in rural areas of India. According to Darsa, 23 million girls drop out of school annually due to lack of proper menstrual hygiene management facilities, which include availability of sanitary napkins and logical awareness of menstruation. Taboos related to periods is the second reason involving young girls from villages to stay at home. Hence, we can assume two points regarding education in India:

  •    There is a huge difference between genders about life opportunities, due to cultural and infra structural reasons;
  •      There is a significant difference between the urban lifestyle and the rural one.


    
Indeed, in Indian cities it is absolutely common to buy napkins in stores. On the other hand, in Indian villages you will not find them at all. Furthermore, it is also difficult to get drinking water.According to the National Family Health Survey report published in December 2017, in India only 58% of women between 15 and 24 years old use a hygienic method of menstrual protection. Also, according to the WASH study carried out by Reproductivetractinfections (RTIs)between 2013 and 2014, “self-reported symptoms of RTI disease were less common in girls and women with access to a latrine (vs open defecation) and lower walking times to a bathing location.” In short, in rural villages hygiene is widely poor.
At the same time, it is well known that the 10 world’s fastest growing cities are Indian. According to the Global Cities Report 2018 by the institute Oxford Economics: Surat; Agra; Bengaluru; Hyderabad; Nagpur; Tiruppur; Rajkot; Tiruchirappalli; Chennai and Vijayawada. As a result, is quite clear the huge economic (and cultural) gap that stands between modern cities and rural villages.

Therefore, what can we do in practice in order to bring menstrual hygiene equality? NGOs’ work seems to be the main way to truly obtain an improvement in social-welfare, hygiene and knowledge about healthcare and taboos constraints.

Since 2010 Heeals is strongly concerned in programmes with villages and rural communities about Wash; Menstrual Hygiene and Health. We belief that education about health care is a priority and because of that we are always working hard on our workshops and new programmes. For instance, the aim of our “Pads for Girls” project is to improve local hygene conditions and economy in Western Uttar Pradesh: we want to buy a sanitary napkins machine and bring it in the village. We deeply believe that this project could improve the local economy, selling napkins especially in local markets. Also, it will be certainly the only way for village women to get sanitary napkins.

-Nancy
(Wash Intern)

Source:







Friday, 26 April 2019

Menstrual Hygiene On Wall

Here’re some photos from our recent “Menstrual Hygiene On Wall” project. The aim is to spread water, sanitation, hygiene ,Menstrual Hygiene & cleanliness rules among students in urban & rural areas and villages and communities in India, through painting bathroom walls in schools. We deeply believe that this is a great idea to remind them some good hygiene habits and we’re sure they’ll never forget it. These walls have some impact full messages about wash and healthcare and children really appreciate it!





































Interested Candidate Looking For Internship /Volunteering/Volunteer travel program At HEEALS Please Contact Us At : communications@heeals.org

MAKE A CONTRIBUTION TO OUR CAUSE :http://heeals.org/donate
Please Come Join Us!
Facebook Page :https://www.facebook.com/Heeals/

Thursday, 25 April 2019

World Malaria Day


World Malaria Day was established in May 2007 by the 60th session of the World Health Assembly, WHO's decision-making body. The day was established to provide "education and understanding of malaria" and spread information on "year-long intensified implementation of national malaria-control strategies, including community-based activities for malaria prevention and treatment in endemic areas.
World Malaria Day (WMD) is an international observance commemorated every year on 25 April and recognizes global efforts to control malaria. Globally, 3.3 billion people in 106 countries are at risk of malaria. In 2012, malaria caused an estimated 627,000 deaths, mostly among African children.Asia, Latin America, and to a lesser extent the Middle East and parts of Europe are also affected.


World Malaria Day sprung out of the efforts taking place across the African continent to commemorate Africa Malaria Day. WMD is one of eight official global public health campaigns currently marked by the World Health Organization(WHO), along with World Health Day, World Blood Donor Day, World Immunization Week, World Tuberculosis Day, World No Tobacco Day, World Hepatitis Day and World AIDS Day.
According to the most recent World Malaria Report, the global tally of malaria reached 429,000 malaria deaths and 212 million new cases in 2015. The rate of new malaria cases fell by 21 per cent globally between 2010 and 2015, and malaria death rates fell by 29 per cent in the same period. In sub-Saharan Africa, case incidence and death rates fell by 21 per cent and 31 per cent, respectively.
“Zero malaria starts with me”
After more than a decade of steady advances in fighting malaria, progress has levelled off.  According to WHO’s latest World malaria report, no significant gains were made in reducing malaria cases in the period 2015 to 2017. The estimated number of malaria deaths in 2017, at 435 000, remained virtually unchanged over the previous year.
Urgent action is needed to get the global response to malaria back on track – and ownership of the challenge lies in the hands of countries most affected by malaria. On World Malaria Day 2019, WHO joins the RBM Partnership to End Malaria, the African Union Commission and other partner organizations in promoting “Zero malaria starts with me,,” a grassroots campaign that aims to keep malaria high on the political agenda, mobilize additional resources, and empower communities to take ownership of malaria prevention and care.

Wednesday, 24 April 2019

THE WASH ON WALL PROJECT



Here’re some photos from our recent “Wash On Wall” project. The aim is to spread water, sanitation, hygiene & cleanliness rules among students in urban & rural areas and villages and communities in India, through painting bathroom walls in schools. We deeply believe that this is a great idea to remind them some good hygiene habits and we’re sure they’ll never forget it. These walls have some impactful messages about wash and healthcare and children really appreciate it!


















Interested Candidate Looking For Internship /Volunteering/Volunteer travel program At HEEALS Please Contact Us At : communications@heeals.org

MAKE A CONTRIBUTION TO OUR CAUSE :http://heeals.org/donate
Please Come Join Us!
Facebook Page :https://www.facebook.com/Heeals/

Monday, 22 April 2019

World Earth Day !

April 22nd Is World Earth Day 2019 is This is year theme is 'Protect Our Species'.
It aims to draw attention to the rapid extinction of species across the world, which is directly linked to human activity which causes climate change, deforestation and pollution.


Interested Candidate Looking For Internship /Volunteering/Volunteer travel program At HEEALS Please Contact Us At : communications@heeals.org
MAKE A CONTRIBUTION TO OUR CAUSE :http://heeals.org/donate
Please Come Join Us!
Facebook Page :https://www.facebook.com/Heeals/

How HEEALS Impacting Lives !


How HEEALS is spreading love, peace, happiness and creating positive impact on lives through their health education environment and livelihood projects .


Interested Candidate Looking For Internship /Volunteering/Volunteer travel program At HEEALS Please Contact Us At : communications@heeals.org
MAKE A CONTRIBUTION TO OUR CAUSE :http://heeals.org/donate

Please Come Join Us!
Facebook Page :https://www.facebook.com/Heeals/
Twitter Page:http://www.twitter.com/heeals

Wednesday, 17 April 2019

Happy Mahavir Jayanti To All


EDUCATION AMONG BOYS AND GIRLS IN RURAL VILLAGES IN INDIA


“The things that I learned from my grandfather and father, [are more] useful and practical than things which others learn from the school.” 

Those are the words of GunabandiyaUruwarige, Wanniyala-Aetto chief, a Sri Lanka tribe. We think that represent the general condition of rural areas all around India in fact of education.
Even if India is considered to be one of the fastest-growing economy, there is a large amount of extra-urban areas where the situation is much different. India is the second largest country in terms of population and the seventh largest in terms of area, so it is difficult to speak generally about the features and the issues of this country. Furthermore, when it comes to educationthere are many factors about traditional habits that should be seen.
Percent literates by level of education in India 2001


Source: censusindia.gov.in


First of all, there is a huge difference between boys and girls in relation to school attendance. For instance, according to the Literacy Rate 2011 census female literacy levels are 65.46% where the male literacy is over 80%.This is due to religion and cultural reasons and it is a matter of fact that in rural areas girls are not receiving equal access to primary education. But what are the real reasons
that involve children to this habit? We think the main ones are economic and cultural. The villages we are talking about have subsistence economies, often the only source of income and living, based on agriculture. Therefore, it is common for the children to help their parents in working and for girls to staying at home and help with housekeeping. In addition, menstrual period is a serious problem which involves girls attending school. Since it is considered a taboo, girls usually stay home to respect their traditional social customs. Indeed, their family would prefer to “protect” them in any situation, not only during their periods but also in their everyday life. For instance, the child marriage which is very common in rural areas is a form of “protection” by their parents: is the only way they have to protect family honour. Child marriage is also a fact of money of course. It is normal for the girl’s family to provide a dowry, but it the boy’s side of the family can raise the dowry if they suspects he has been in school with boys during puberty. 

What has HEEALS done for education among boys and girls in rural villages in India?
Since 2010 Heeals is strongly concerned in programmes with villages and rural communities about Wash; Menstrual Hygene and Health; Education. Our mission is to deal against taboos that involve fear and insecurity in people and in children above all. One of our major project is “pads for girls” and we strongly think that giving help and health care could change traditional habits about periods and let girls feel free. The Course of Self-defence we are planning is also an important opportunity for girls to reach a physically and mentally security. Furthermore, our workshops and projects are even made for boys, because it is fundamental to include everybody in order to change dangerous habits.

-Nancy
(wash intern)

REFERENCES









DO YOU KNOW !

About 26% of people in India are unable to finished their primary education . 
Designed & edited by -Nancy (wash intern)

"Who opens a door for education close the doors of

Poverty,Hunger & Prison" - HEEALS 

Tuesday, 16 April 2019

Parents, haath dhulao, bimari bhagao!!


Parents, do you know when children play in open areas, they touch things that may be contaminated by a MICROBE!!! For example, they could end up touching feces (poop) from animals or people ACCIDENTALLY andmay result with an infection simply because aSINGLE gram of human poop may contain 1 TRILLION germs. And did you know that you could possibly avoid an infection or MANY visits to the doctor if the kids were trained to wash their hands more regularly. In fact, hand-washing is fool-proof way of keeping your kids away from common infections such as common cold.Dirty hands take the microbe to everywhere they touch including YOU. This is called cross-contamination and it is a very common way of spreading germs, jumping from the inanimate object (for example, if someone sneezed on it) or poop they touched to their skin to their face-nose, lips, eyes(by frequent touching). Some micro-organisms can survive for several minutes on your kid’s or your skin and may spread to another object or person by touching.
Some of these common microbes are listed below in a table to give you an idea which diseases can be prevented by hand-washing:
Common diseases/conditions
Name of micro-organism
Source of contamination
Diarrhoea
Salmonella
Animal or human feces
Escherichia  coli
Enterovirus (Cox-sackie virus)
Respiratory infection
Adenovirus
Common cold
Rhinoviruses
Sneeze or secretions of infected person
Respiratory syncital virus, flu virus, some common cold viruses
meningitis
Neisseria meningitides, Streptococcus
Secretions of infected person
flu
Influenza virus
Even by touching an infected person
Hepatitis A
Hepatitis A virus
Feces of an infected person
Now that we know how many infections proceed in absence of proper hand wash, let us define when your kids need hand wash the most:
  • When hands are visibly soiled.
  • After using the washroom.
  • After blowing their nose or after sneezing in the hands.
  • Before and after eating or drinking.
  • After handling garbage or contact with contaminated surfaces such as garbage bins, cleaning cloths.
  • After visiting sick people.
  • Before taking any medications.
  • After contact with blood or body fluids such as vomit or saliva.
  • Before and after touching a cut or wound.
  • After handling pets, animals or animal waste.
  • After handling pet food or pet treats.
  • After being outside (playing, gardening, walking the dog, etc.)
Once you have identified the possible ways of contaminations, don’t forget to cultivate the proper and regular hand wash method. Make it fun for them so that they enjoy this little habit and have a healthy childhood.
Proper hand wash requires:
1.      Adequate amount of soap – rinsing hands in water only is not as effective as soap lathering. Water temperature is not an important factor for effective cleaning. Washing should be at least for a minimum of 15 seconds or longer (if hands are visibly soiled). Parents may sing a short song to keep children entertained for the required time.
2.      Rubbing hands to have adequate friction- scrubbing the hands, between fingers, back of hands, wrists and forearms. Under the nails when possible.
3.      Rinse with clean running water to get the best results.
Once you have cultivated this habit, you can control:
  • 1.      Spread of microorganisms from your child’s hand to other parts of the body as they subconsciously touch other body parts especially face without realizing.
  • 2.      Spread of microbes from your child’s hand to food when eating. Some micro-organisms can grow in certain foods if left alone and make people sick.
  • 3.      Dirty hands may transfer germs to the objects they touch such as handrails, table tops, toys etc.
  • 4.      The overuse of antibiotics and thus curb emerging problem of antibiotic resistance.
  • So, Parent, don't underestimate the power of hand washing! The time you spend at the sink could save you trips to the doctor's office.

About the Organization:
Heeals, an organization dedicated towards spreading awareness about the goodness associated with regular hand wash to kids has been organizing events as well as workshops for the last many years. Some of these workshops such as “WASH workshop in schools of villages in western Uttar Pradesh”, “Schools in Gurgaon urban area” and through “Origami: the art of paper folding as a fun activity to implement hand wash”. Through their endeavors, Heeals volunteers teach kids not only the importance of hand wash but also how to make hand wash a part of their life.

  • For the Socially relevant cause, Heeals is constantly looking for volunteers as well as donations to continue their excellent endeavors. For donations, access here.
About the blog author:Dr. Gurjot Kaur is currently working as Associate Professor at Shoolini University, Solan. Being a toxicologist by profession and a conservationist by choice, she constantly participates in writing about important health and environmental issues especially in high risk populations such as children. Commending Heeals work, she has associated with Heeals initiative as a blogger.