We Can't Do It Alone , We Need Your Support

We Can't Do It Alone , We Need Your Support
To Provide awareness regarding Girl Child Education , Menstrual Hygiene ,Girls Toilet , Sanitation and Safe Drinking Water , to thousands of families to make there lives Healthy and Happier !!! Please Support Our Fundraising Campaign To Reach Out To 25,000 Targeted Families In 5 States of India PLEASE MAKE THIS PICTURE YOUR COVER PAGE JUST FOR A DAY AT LEAST ! DONATE & SHARE

Thursday, 21 March 2019

Wishing Everyone A Very Happy ,Colorful,Joyful & Safe HOLI ! :)

COME JOIN HEEALS TO EXPLORE INDIA 
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Monday, 18 March 2019

Stop Child Marriage & Save Girl and Educate Girl Child Campaign

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Stop Child Marriage & Save Girl & Educate Girl

Stop Child Marriage & Save Girl & Educate Girl Workshop Was Organized In Uttar Pradesh Schools.






Why Child Marriage is happening in India?


Child marriage in India, according to the Indian law, is a marriage where either the woman is below age 18 or the man is below age 21. Most child marriages involve underage women, many of whom are in poor socio-economic conditions.
Yet, recent data indicates that in the last decade there has been a significant decline in the prevalence of child marriage from 47 per cent to 27 per cent of the proportion of women aged 20-24 years who were married before age 18 from 2005/2006 to 2015/2016. National and state averages, however, mask realities at the district level, and despite the overall decline, a few districts continue to have very high rates of child marriage. Indeed, India has the largest number of brides in the world – one-third of the global total. (Child marriage rates among women in a few districts of Rajasthan and Bihar, continue to be in the range of 47 per cent to 51 per cent).
There are many causes of child marriage in India and multiple barriers to its elimination. Child marriage is driven by gender inequality and the belief that girls are somehow inferior to boys. In India, child marriage is also driven by:
·       Poverty: Child marriage is more common among poorer households, with many families marrying off their daughters to reduce their perceived economic burden. Girls are often married off at a younger age because less dowry is expected for younger brides.
·      Betrothal: Some girls are promised in marriage before they are born in order to “secure” their future. Once they reach puberty, ceremonies take place and they are sent to their husband’s home to commence married life.
·       Level of education: Many families consider girls to be parayadhan – someone else’s wealth. This means that a girl’s productive capacities benefit her marital family, and educating daughters is therefore seen as less of a priority than educating sons, who are responsible for taking care of biological parents in old age.
·      Household labour: Girls are often married off at puberty when they are deemed most ‘productive’ and can take care of children and conduct housework. The labour of young brides is central to some rural economies. The practice of attasatta sees two extended families exchange girls through marriage so neither family is worse off in terms of household labour.
·     Traditional customs: Customary laws based on religion are a major barrier in ending child marriage in India. Social pressure to marry at puberty can be enormous within certain castes.
·     Gender norms: There is generally a lower value attached to daughters, and girls are expected to be adaptable, docile, hardworking and talented wives. Child marriages are sometimes used to control female sexuality, sanctify sex and ensure reproduction.
·     Pre-marital sex: Marriage is used to preserve the purity of girls as soon as they reach puberty and, sometimes, to ensure that they are not “corrupted” by men of lower castes. There is a high premium placed on virginity, and as such it is sometimes considered more punya (holy) to marry off younger girls. Fathers sometimes lose credibility within communities if their daughters have sex or get married without their consent. Differentiation is made between jaangdaan (when a girl is so young she can sit on her father’s lap during a marriage ceremony) and pattaldaan (when she has attained puberty and can sit on a pedestal beside her father).
   Violence against girls: Some girls are married off due to fear of kharabmahaul – the corrupted external environment – and reports of the rape of women in public spaces. However, a 2014 study found that child brides in India are at greater risk of sexual and physical violence within their marital home.
HEEALS (Health, Education, Environment And Livelihood Society), is an organization directly involved in girls education and health in India. It is working on Water Sanitation, Menstrual Hygiene and Children Education projects in seven states. Through spreading education on Water, Sanitation and Hygiene and organizing WASH and MH workshop, HEEALS is working to increase the attendance rates of girls in schools who drop out from school due to child marriage. HEEALS works in marginalized communities, slum schools, schools in unauthorised colonies, orphanages and refugee camps to increase the attendance rates of pupils in schools who leave their studies, reduce the number of diseases and deaths and improve the health of people across Indian society.

-Caterina
WASH & Children Health Education
Coordinator

REFERENCES:
·         UNICEF India Final report 2018
·         International Institute for Population Sciences and Macro International, National Family Health Survey (NFHS-4), 2015-16: State Fact Sheet for Bihar, Gujarat, Madhya, Maharashtra, Odisha, Pradesh, Rajasthan and West Bengal, IIPS, Mumbai, 2016.
·         UNICEF-UNFPA, Global Programme to Accelerate Action to End Child Marriage, 2017, (accessed February 2018)


Monday, 11 March 2019

STOP CHILD MARRIAGE, VALUE GIRLS!



What is a child marriage?Marriage should be a time for celebration and joy – unless you are one of the 64 million girls around the world forced into marriage before the age of 18.
Child marriage is a violation of child rights, and has a negative impact on physical growth, health, mental and emotional development, and education opportunities. It is defined as a marriage of a girl or boy before the age of 18 and refers to both formal marriages and informal unions in which children under the age of 18 live with a partner as if married.One in 3 girls in the developing world is married by age 18, 1 in 9 by the time she's 15.The 
United Nations Population Fund estimates that every year, more than 14 million adolescent and teen girls are married, almost always forced into the arrangement by their parents. The countries with the highest rates of child marriage are in sub-Saharan Africa, but those with the largest number of child brides are in South Asia.Each day, 39.000 girls under the age of 18 become child brides. That’s about one every two seconds.

Child marriage is the result of the interplay of economic and social forces. In communities where the practice is prevalent, marrying a girl as a child is part of a cluster of social norms and attitudes that reflect the low value accorded to the human rights of girls. It is important to notice that child marriage affects both boys and girls, but it is more common among girls. Child marriage has lasting consequences on girls, from their health, education and social development perspectives. These consequences last well beyond adolescence. One of the most common causes of death for girls aged 15 to 19 in developing countries was pregnancy and childbirth. Child brides are almost always married to older menand lack the standing or skills to negotiate over sex or birth control. That means many get pregnant soon after marriage, when their bodies are too underdeveloped or too small to handle it. Girls younger than 15 are five times more likely to die in childbirth than women in their 20s, according to the 
International Center for Research on Women.

UNICEF and UNFPA have joined forces through a Global Programme to Accelerate Action to End Child Marriage. The programme was launched in 2015 to cover eight states with moderate to high rates of child marriage, focusing on districts with the highest incidence. Four of the states have shown promising decline in the rates of child marriage over the past ten years – Bihar, Madhya Pradesh, and Rajasthan – and four have had more moderate progress – Maharashtra, Gujarat, Odisha, and West Bengal. For the first time, existing strategies in areas like health, education, child protection, and water and sanitation, are coming together to form a unique holistic programme with shared plans and goals. Working in partnership with governments, civil society organizations and young people themselves, methods that have already been proven to work will be operated at scale.

HOW TO PREVENT IT?  There are many causes of child marriage in India and multiple barriers to its elimination. Hunger, lower social status, chores, early marriage, school safety and sanitation are all barriers preventing a girl from receiving a proper education. Education can be a life-saving resource that establishes a vulnerable child’s sense of normalcy and builds self-esteem and hope for the future. Many experts consider education an essential humanitarian response to complex emergencies, closely following food, water and shelter. Also having access to basic clean water and a decent toilet saves children's lives, gives women an advantage in earning money and ensures a good food supply. Improved sanitation can keep a girl in school by making facilities available to her when she reaches puberty. Education empowers women: one additional school year can increase a woman’s earnings by 10% to 20%.
HEEALS(Health, Education, Environment And Livelihood Society), is an organization directly involved in girls education and health in India. It is working on Water Sanitation, Menstrual Hygiene and Children Education projects in seven states. Through spreading education on Water, Sanitation and Hygiene and organizing WASH and MH workshop, HEEALS is working to increase the attendance rates of girls in schools who drop out from school due to child marriage. HEEALS works in marginalized communities, slum schools, schools in unauthorised colonies, orphanages and refugee camps to increase the attendance rates of pupils in schools who leave their studies, reduce the number of diseases and deaths and improve the health of people across Indian society.
- Caterina
WASH Intern 




REFERENCES:
·       UNICEF India Final report 2018
·    United Nations Children’s Fund, Ending Child Marriage: Progress and prospects, UNICEF, New York, 2014.
·         5 Things you may not know about Child Marriage NPR, Washington DC
·    International Institute for Population Sciences and Macro International, National Family Health Survey (NFHS-4), 2015-16: State Fact Sheet for Bihar, Gujarat, Madhya, Maharashtra, Odisha, Pradesh, Rajasthan and West Bengal, IIPS, Mumbai, 2016.


Thursday, 7 March 2019

We Welcome Our New Intern

We welcome our New Intern From Italy.She is working on WASH & Children Health & Education Project.










Interested Candidate Looking For Internship /Volunteering/Volunteer travel program At HEEALS Please Contact Us At : communications@heeals.org


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Wednesday, 6 March 2019

“A period should end a sentence, not a girl’s education”


A documentary on menstruation, set in rural India, titled Period. End of Sentence, won the
Oscar in the Documentary Short Subject category at the 91st Academy Awards (24th
February 2019). Iranian filmmaker Rayka Zehtabchi has directed the short film, which has
been produced by Indian producer Guneet Monga's Sikhya Entertainment.
The film came into being a part of The Pad Project, started by students at the Oakwood
School in Los Angeles and their teacher, Melissa Berton. From the award-winning director
Rayka Zehtabchi, the producer Guneet Monga, and a hardworking group of students,
parents, and teachers from a small high school in Los Angeles, California, comes Period. End
of Sentence. Winner of the Academy Award qualifying festivals for Best Short Doc at The
Cleveland International Film Festival, The Traverse City Film Festival as well as many others
including AFIFest, and Savannah. India's moment at the Oscars comes exactly a decade after
A R Rahman and sound engineer Resul Pookutty won the Academy awards for Slumdog
Millionaire in 2009.
The documentary follows a group of local women in a village outside Delhi located in
the Hapur District, as they learn how to operate a machine that makes low-cost,
biodegradable sanitary pads, which they sell to other women at affordable prices. When a
sanitary pad machine is installed in the village, the women learn to manufacture and market
their own pads, empowering the women financially as workers and as a sales force, and also
in terms of self-confidence. The women there are leading a quiet revolution, fighting against
the deeply rooted stigma of menstruation. Their growing independence garners them a new
level of respect from the men of their community, and the taboo on mentioning a woman’s
period is disappearing. This not only helps to improve feminine hygiene by providing access
to basic products but supports and empowers the women to shed the taboos in India
surrounding menstruation, all while contributing to the economic future of their community.
Today, the unit employs seven women, between 18 and 31 years of age. They work six days
a week and are paid a monthly salary of 2,500 rupees. The centre produces 600 pads a day
and they are sold under the brand name Fly. This little business, run from two rooms in a
village home, has helped improve feminine hygiene. Until it was set up most women in the
village were using pieces of cloth cut out from old saris or bedsheets when they had their
period, now 70% use pads. It has also de-stigmatised menstruation and changed attitudes in a
conservative society in ways that were unimaginable just a couple of years ago.
HEEALS (Health, Education, Environment And Livelihood Society) is one of those
organizations directly involved in facing menstrual taboo in India. It is working on Water
Sanitation, Menstrual Hygiene and Children Education projects in seven states. Through
spreading education on Water, Sanitation and Hygiene and organizing WASH and MH
workshop, HEEALS is working to increase the attendance rates of girls in schools who drop
out from school due to their period, reduce the number of diseases and improve
self-confidence of girls in Indian society. We can’t be more proud that a documentary on
menstrual hygiene in India won an Oscar at the Academy Awards. This shows a general
interest in this delicate topic which is a common taboo across our society. We hope that this
awards will raise awareness all over the country and abroad to face a social stigma that is
necessary to break down. Furthermore we firmly agree with Melissa Berton, the film
producer, who told the crowd while accepting the Oscar: "A period should end a sentence,
not a girl’s education!”. Much more needs to be done in this sector, and we hope that Period.
End of Sentence could motivate other people to help girls and women around India.

-Manuel
WASH Intern

References:
https://abcnews.go.com/GMA/Culture/documentary-short-oscar-winner-period-endsentence-
girls/story?id=61281827
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-india-47307335
https://www.businesstoday.in/trending/entertainment/netflix-indian-short-documentaryperiod-
end-of-sentence-wins-oscar/story/321940.html
https://www.peoplesworld.org/article/period-end-of-sentence-short-documentary-aboutmenstruation-
and-sanitary-pads/
https://www.thepadproject.org
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Period._End_of_Sentence.